Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Oct 1 and Nov 1 Post (Hydrid Day)

Post one excerpt from the Taylor & Helfenbein reading, then ask a question about the quote/excerpt.  That's it!

57 comments:

Nicholas Sheridan, Jr. said...

The quote that I chose from this article is located on page 325.

"To tourists, the media represents D.C. as this wonderful place to be with lots to
do. Don’t get me wrong, there are some beautiful places in D.C. to see such as
the museums, monuments, gardens, and other historic places. This is not D.C. as a
whole. This is a problem because leaving out important details is a lie; “lying by
omission”. To the White residents, D.C. also seems to be this great place to live, but
if there are problems the reason it is going down hill is because of the minorities.
All the crime you usually see broadcasted on the news in our area are committed by
minorities. Like White people don’t commit crime."

The question I have about this article is that whether or not the reason newscasters omit including "white-crime committed incidents" in their broadcasts is because they feel their viewers are predominantly white and do not want to view the bad people of their race?

Vinicius Taguchi said...

"The difficult task of understanding and adopting the theoretical frame of Critical Geography has become even more challenging due to the globalized spaces that people inhabit, spaces characterized by current trends toward measurement, assessment, and standardization—all of which normalize a certain way of
conceiving and perceiving," (Taylor & Helfenbein 321-322).

What exactly is "Critical Geography," and why would it be more difficult to implement in an area of "globalization?" Isn't that a positive aspect of modern society?

Jaleeza Brown said...

"Often times, and increasingly more so within the current manifestation of globalization, state space and its ideological
accoutrements puts us in our place and creates a way of knowing that puts us in our space too" (Taylor & Helfenbein 321).

Who defines the state spaces ? How does these spaces choose what place each particular group should be put it?

Bryan Britt said...

"The media, as usual, only portrays the political and “White” side of DC when they have something positive to say. If it is something negative, it will inevitably focus on a minority group, especially Blacks. As the media ignores the reality of poverty, crime, and delinquency in DC, it will only be delaying solving the problem and allow it to fester. This was clearly seen in New Orleans when America “woke up,” even if for a few days to the reality of Black poverty and desperation in this country. Sadly, after Katrina, the media will go back to their old ways and this should change." This students excerpt is interesting. The media is very persuasive and edit everything they show. Crime that is committed in D.C. comes from both the white community and black community. Is more crime committed from the black community that lives in poverty and is that why more of it is seen rather than the white crime? The white crime that is committed in D.C. is probably on the political level and that might be why it is not shown because it would reveal how corrupt our political system is.

Casey Kivett said...

“The pedagogy presented here tried to get at the production of experiences and
the meaning people make of them; this reflects an intentional focus of exposing
theoretical, as well as ethical, commitments in writing and representation but
the lessons here extend into our exploration of educational research and new
ways of thinking about school and society. Just as education doesn’t just happen
in Building 39 Room 110, there are limitless and different contexts of learners
interacting with the world, all with existing contingent on place and particularity.
Eric Zencey (1996) advocates for a shift toward “rooted education” that takes to
task what non-Black universities often perpetuate in the name of “multicultural
inclusiveness,” that being a “politics of placeless identity rather than a politics of
rootedness in place” ( 17). In a process of globalization, where space and time
appear to be compressed at dizzying rates, the “inferior” or “deficient” places (just
like “inferior” or “deficient” literacies) tend to be occluded or “corrected” through
spectacular abstraction and separation (Debord 1994). Identity—too often treated
as an abstraction—in scholarship that takes the production and productive nature
of space seriously, comes to the fore as part of a rhizomatic collection of forces.
The usefulness of Critical Geography to the study of educational foundation,
therefore, resides in the explicit call for study of the ways in which space, place,
power, and identity are already, always intertwined and at work.” (327)

At the dinner table at home my parents would always tell me to clean my plate because, “There are starving children in Africa that would kill for my meal.” It is a testament to how much globalization has informed us of other people’s problems halfway around the world. In your paper you seem to advocate for a change in how we practice education to a more local set of learning as it relates to our environment opposed to a broad knowledge of the entire world. Are you hoping make people more conscious of local problems in run down local neighborhoods so that they may provide a solid effort to fix them, or to escape the racism that has arisen from not knowing a place that is right down the street? Or, to go back to my original statement, are you trying to replace the “children in Africa” to the “children in Raleigh’s ghettos”?

Dustin Bizub said...

Page 327: "In just about every community, but especially those located in urban environs,citizens are increasingly witnessing(assuming they are paying attention)the emergence of extreme segregation epitomized by a New Orleans or Washington, DC, where there exists “a dual city spatially, as well as socially
and economically” (Lipman 2003, 28)."

What are some of the reasons that cause this separtion?

Cody Davidson said...

“Just as education doesn’t just happen in Building 39 Room 110, there are limitless and different contexts of learners interacting with the world, all with existing contingent on place and particularity.” (Taylor & Helfenbein (2009), 327)

How much does location affect the ability of someone to learn, both in and out of the classroom?

Andrew Benson said...

"Discourses are ways of being in the world, or forms of life which integrate words, acts, values, beliefs, attitudes, social identities, as well as gestures, glances, body positions, and clothes. A Discourse is a sort of identity kit which comes complete with the appropriate costume and instructions on how to act, talk, and often write, so as to take on a particular social role that others will recognize." (142) (Taylor & Helfenbein) (James Gee 1990)

To what extent is society bound to these discourses? Does the extent vary based on gender, race, or ethnicity?

Mikeyd said...

"Relevantly, the hidden spaces of the city, standing in as metonyms for the intentionally hidden problems of globalization, are alien and occluded from the majority of educators' current lifeworlds, and any future heterotopias informed about race and gender by anything other than abstraction. In the local literacy projects that dominate the curriculum examples here, the epitome of Debord's spectacular representation, and its attendant demands, is readily apparent."

My question is, does this excerpt saying that educators are only focusing on "abstraction" when teaching because the problems of globalization are "alien and occluded" to them? Or is this excerpt trying to say these educators are completely unaware of the "hidden spaces" and "hidden problems" of the globalization?

derek silk said...

"These students are, in many ways, the abstractions that scholars in
educations at suburban colleges and universities do not know but write about and
construct anyway. It is interesting and important for these students to have access
to this space, to have a place, at this HBCU situated next to the embassies of
Israel and China, and on the fringe of Cleveland Park with its multimillion dollar
homes (these places and spaces exist as abstractions to the students just as the
students exist as abstractions to these places and spaces). It is very troubling and
problematic, as their presence and access in this space is strictured and relegated
Downloaded by [North Carolina State University] at 11:08 01 November 2012 EDUCATIONAL STUDIES 321
in ways that mine, and that of others like me, is not (although rest assured that state
space strictures and relegates all within it). Often times, and increasingly more so
within the current manifestation of globalization, state space and its ideological
accoutrements puts us in our place and creates a way of knowing that puts us in
our space too."

I really enjoyed this excerpt, along with the entire article. As part of my business class I was told to attend a meeting of a Student Network Group, I happened to come across one called "Taste of Africa". This article really relates to the meeting I attended in which the main theme was "the danger of a single story", meaning it is harmful to African Americans that people on a global scale have prejudiced and stereotypical opinions about the African Americans as a whole and not as individuals. This really connects to what I heard at the meeting and the meeting provided me with a much better understanding of your article. My question is; why do people prejudice against certain races based on statistics or mere stereotypes? Individuals deserve their own story, not entire races.

Tara Lucas said...

"Just as education doesn't just happen in Building 39 Room 110, there are limitless and different contexts of learners interacting with the world, all with existing contingent on place and particularity."

My question is how does this quote relate to the Indigenous people, like those in the article "Indigenous resistance and racist schooling on the borders of empires: Coast Salish cultural survival" and the way children learned of their people's culture?

Raleigh Adams said...

"The border, while signifying the differences between two empires, made little
sense to Coast Salish people who continued to travel between villages for ceremonies
and to maintain the fabric of traditional cultural patterns."

Is this similar to any other culture you have researched?

Kyle Anderson said...

"Although the ideology that supports racism, and the conceptualization of
racism, is apparent at times (and clear to this student), the ideology at work to
make suspects and subjects of women is nearly invisible due to the inattentiveness
to language and the inability to see simultaneous relation between sexuality, gender, race, and materiality."

To me, this is saying that gender discrimination is on the rise because people cannot simultaneously relate between gender, race, and materiality. How can this be if over the course of history women have steadily gained more and more responsibility as time has progressed? A few examples of this would be suffrage, ability to work in the workforce, and allowance of positions of leadership i.e deacons within a church.

Perry Fountain said...

"The implication for inquiry in educational foundations builds upon the plea that people not dismiss language or the 'givens' of communication that enable and encourage readings, and as Gee illuminates recognitions, of rhetorical situations in the everyday, be it in inner-city DC or in the exurban enclaves of Fairfax County."

To me what this says is we change the way we communicate to one another depending on where we are what kind of environment we are in.

Gregory Fields said...

"Spaces of entertainment
or violence seem to be privileged by youth culture, and certainly are materially
more real (and even more appealing) than school and the possibilities it represents"


My question is, "How do we fix the way that our youth view schooling?"

Josh Jordan said...

"Evidenced and exemplified by many of the following student writings and comments, it is apparent that, to date, the academy seems to have failed at providing an appropriate liberatory discourse for the concerns, problems, and even dreams of most women and people of color."

How come women and people of color are affected? Is there anything that can be done to suppress the white male dominance?

Amanda Averett said...

"The difficult task of understanding and adopting the theoretical frame of Critical Geography has become even more challenging due to the globalized spaces that people inhabit, spaces characterized by current trends toward measurement, assessment, and standardization—all of which normalize a certain way of conceiving and perceiving. Ultimately this norming yields “spectacular separation” (Debord 1994, 120) where an idealized reality exists, one where Others’ identities get disconnected from communities, erased, negated, or articulated as characterized by deficiency (i.e., deficient literacies, behavior, etc.). In vulgar terms, these identities, places, and spaces get hidden. These trends typify the most insidious quality of the current form of globalization, that is: an articulation of ubiquitous, uniform, and systemically oppressive social scripts" (Taylor and Helfenbein 321-322).


What is the initial cause for this separation? I understand how the places become specialized and how identities get lost, but I am curious as to what influences what environments certain types of people end up in.

Ivey Griffin said...

"Eric Zencey (1996) advocates for a shift toward “rooted education” that takes to task what non-Black universities often perpetuate in the name of “multicultural
inclusiveness,”"

Would a non-Black university be a school that only Caucasians went to? And if so how would that be "multicultural inclusiveness"?

Caroline Bojarski said...

"Ultimately this norming yields “spectacular separation”
(Debord 1994, 120) where an idealized reality exists, one where Others’
identities get disconnected from communities, erased, negated, or articulated as
characterized by deficiency (i.e., deficient literacies, behavior, etc.). In vulgar
terms, these identities, places, and spaces get hidden. These trends typify the most
insidious quality of the current form of globalization, that is: an articulation of
ubiquitous, uniform, and systemically oppressive social scripts."

Is there a way to get rid of the standardization and bring about individuality instead?

adrian ross said...

Stepping off of the Van Ness/University of the District of Columbia Metro escalator, I [Taylor] am venturing further into the space of the State.

Why did you specifically choose this college?

Ben Cogsdale said...

Although this student recognizes the failure of the city’s effort to control the
discourse, she interestingly points to the reality of 50 Cent’s story: “fact not fiction.”
Note that school appears nowhere in the social dynamic to which she refers.
Rhetorical questions and positionings, scripts rather, abound. What can a Black
man do or be? What is the “fact not fiction” of Black men in an urban environment?
Relationally, what does this mean for women? Spaces of entertainment
or violence seem to be privileged by youth culture, and certainly are materially
more real (and even more appealing) than school and the possibilities it represents.
In a certain sense all educators are implicated here. For instance, the following
questions could reasonably be asked and attendant actions scrutinized: Where are
the pathways/discourses to the nonpatriarchal and nonracist utopias educational
scholars profess at conferences and in academic journals? Who is committed to
living them and making them real? We might not like where this takes us, but the
sojourn is necessary.

How can we change the discourse to where it is more appealing to achieve our goals using the routes of school and education?

Molly Casey said...

The difficult task of understanding and adopting the theoretical frame of Critical Geography has become even more challenging due to the globalized spaces that people inhabit, spaces characterized by current trends toward measure- ment, assessment, and standardization—all of which normalize a certain way of
conceiving and perceiving.

Pages 321-322

What is "Critical Geography" and why is it so difficult to understand?

Chelsi Oxendine said...

"The implication for inquiry in educational foundations builds upon the plea that people not dismiss language or the 'givens' of communication that enable and encourage readings, and as Gee illuminates recognitions, of rhetorical situations in the everyday, be it in inner-city DC or in the exurban enclaves of Fairfax County."


Is this excerpt asking whether or not place has an impact on education?

Lynda Bellia said...

"Using a Critical Geography framework to think about broad questions of
schooling and society, issues of gender, blackness, and the urban all come to the
fore."

What exactly is Critical Geography?

Michael Brangle said...

"Although the ideology that supports racism, and the conceptualization of racism, is apparent at times (and clear to this student), the ideology at work to make suspects and subjects of women is nearly invisible due to the inattentiveness to language and the inability "

I am a bit confused by this quote. Is it saying that racism is it stating that racism is growing in today's world? If so, this can't possibly be true can it? Or is it presenting reasonings for the students somewhat racial writing?

Jack Walsh said...

"Often times, and increasingly more so within the current manifestation of globalization, state space and its ideological accoutrements puts us in our place and creates a way of knowing that puts us in our space too."


What does it mean by a way of knowing to put us in our space? I have heard of the phrase put in your own place, but what does it mean by space?

Sarah Beebe said...

'To tourists, the media represents D.C. as this wonderful place to be with lots to do. Don't get me wrong, there are some beautiful places in D.C. to see such as the museums, monuments, gardens, and other historic places. This is not D.C. as a whole. This is a problem because leaving out important details is a lie; “lying by omission”. To the White residents, D.C. also seems to be this great place to live, but if there are problems the reason it is going down hill is because of the minorities. All the crime you usually see broadcasted on the news in our area are committed by minorities. Like White people don't commit crime."

Living in Virginia, I find this excerpt very accurate but strange. Though most of the violent crimes committed in DC, how is it possible to say white people don't commit crimes? Aside from theft, murder, etc., don't white people commit embezzlement, identity theft, fraud, etc.? I don't know if it's the fact that I live in the area, but I see many legal and white collar crimes on the front page.

Shelby Snedecor said...

"Certainly, one could substitute race for gender and sexuality here, yielding a materialization of the familiar reprise of America’s historical racial exploitation and oppression. What is significant, though is that globalization ensures an ex- pedited proliferation of practices and literacies on scales never before dreamt of. This includes systemic forms of oppression, namely racism and sexism, proving Hardt and Negri’s (2004) point that, in globalized spaces, fair and socially just representation is truly at stake" (Taylor and Helfenbein 325-326).

There have been major social conflicts surrounding oppression of genders and race and while there have been changes made in society to prevent inequality and discrimination, rather unfair differentiation, society is not completely right, fair and unbiased to any differentiating trait. What is holding society back from not discriminating against minorities and why can society not move forward?

Alexis Cope said...


“…To the White residents, D.C. also seems to be this great place to live, but
if there are problems the reason it is going down hill is because of the minorities.
All the crime you usually see broadcasted on the news in our area are committed by
minorities. Like White people don’t commit crime.”

Is this really true of D.C., or are minority crimes what the media chooses to broadcast and focus on? What is the cause of this violent culture in minorities?

John Cameron Murray said...

"It is interesting and important for these students to have access
to this space, to have a place, at this HBCU situated next to the embassies of
Israel and China, and on the fringe of Cleveland Park with its multimillion dollar
homes (these places and spaces exist as abstractions to the students just as the
students exist as abstractions to these places and spaces). It is very troubling and
problematic, as their presence and access in this space is strictured and relegated
in ways that mine, and that of others like me, is not (although rest assured that state
space strictures and relegates all within it). Often times, and increasingly more so
within the current manifestation of globalization, state space and its ideological
accoutrements puts us in our place and creates a way of knowing that puts us in
our space too."

So basically what you're saying is that our physical place instills a certain mindset in us that predetermines our social place ("putting us in our place")? And that is why these multimillion dollar homes are abstract to the students who see them every day?

ErnieR said...

A Discourse is a sort of identity kit which comes complete with the appropriate costume and instructions on how to act, talk, and often write, so as to take on a particular social role that others will recognize (pg323).

If Discourse relates to race, is it based off of past history or does it change over time when depicting how a certain race should act?

Nikola Milisav said...

To tourists, the media represents D.C. as this wonderful place to be with lots to
do. Don’t get me wrong, there are some beautiful places in D.C. to see such as
the museums, monuments, gardens, and other historic places. This is not D.C. as a
whole. This is a problem because leaving out important details is a lie; “lying by
omission”. To the White residents, D.C. also seems to be this great place to live, but
if there are problems the reason it is going down hill is because of the minorities.
All the crime you usually see broadcasted on the news in our area are committed by
minorities. Like White people don’t commit crime.

The media is usually controlled by white people, but is this why they only broadcast news of crimes committed by minorities? Are the media companies trying to leave out the people that typically watch news and make them feel isolated from all of the violence going on around them?

Caroline Miller said...

Globalization discourse situates the local (and thus all of us) in a place of subor- dination, as “the other within” of the global order. At worst it makes victims of localities and robs them of economic agency and self-determination. Yet in doing so globalization suggests its own antidote, particularly with respect to the economy: Imagine what it would mean, and how unsettling it would be to all that is now in place, if the locality were to become the active subject of its economic experience.

What does globalization discourse mean?

Adrian Taylor said...

Page 325

"Although the ideology that supports racism, and the conceptualization of racism, is apparent at times (and clear to this student), the ideology at work to make suspects and subjects of women is nearly invisible due to the inattentiveness to language and the inability to see simultaneous relation between sexuality, gen- der, race, and materiality."

What exactly is the ideology that supports racism? What does language have to do with sexuality? If racism is visible through different languages shouldn't sexuality be too?

Ashley Levan said...

Patricia Hill Collins, in her critique of contemporary ideology and what she labels as The New Racism, highlights social scripts (the aforementioned interstices)
as vehicles “that show people appropriate gender ideology as well as how to
behave toward one another” (18). In Social Linguistics and Literacies: Ideology
in Discourses, James Gee (1990) also forwards a useful definition:
Discourses are ways of being in the world, or forms of life which integrate words,
acts, values, beliefs, attitudes, social identities, as well as gestures, glances, body
positions, and clothes. A Discourse is a sort of identity kit which comes complete
with the appropriate costume and instructions on how to act, talk, and often write,
so as to take on a particular social role that others will recognize. (142)

Why does society have these set discourses that people are supposed to take on? Will you not be recognized as part of a particular group if you do not take on all of the parts of their discourse? As we talked about in class with why girls shave their legs and our only response was that it was expected socially. Why are the parts that make up these discourses socially expected? And how did society decide the parts of these discourses?

Katie Magee said...

"These students are, in many ways, the abstractions that scholars in educations at suburban colleges and universities do not know but write about and construct anyway. It is interesting and important for these students to have access to this space, to have a place, at this HBCU situated next to the embassies of Israel and China, and on the fringe of Cleveland Park with its multimillion dollar homes (these places and spaces exist as abstractions to the students just as the students exist as abstractions to these places and spaces)."

Why must the juxtaposition of the HBCU and embassys with multi-million dollar homes represent the differing cultures? This does not necessarily define boundaries of race, but more historical background. If these boundaries and differing senses of place and space have existed for so long, what can be done to break down these barriers, if anything?

sydney wilkinson said...

"The media, as usual, only portrays the political and “White” side of DC when they have something positive to say. If it is something negative, it will inevitably focus on a minority group, especially Blacks. As the media ignores the reality of poverty, crime, and delinquency in DC, it will only be delaying solving the problem and allow it to fester. This was clearly seen in New Orleans when America “woke up,” even if for a few days to the reality of Black poverty and desperation in this country. Sadly, after Katrina, the media will go back to their old ways and this should change."

Does the media portray this which leads to individual mindsets like this, or do individual mindsets lead to media portrayal of this?

SW said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
SW said...

"What can a Black man do or be? What is the “fact not fiction” of Black men in an urban environment? Relationally, what does this mean for women? Spaces of entertainment or violence seem to be privileged by youth culture, and certainly are materially more real (and even more appealing) than school and the possibilities it represents."

What can be done about this, and does it hold true for black immigrants as well as black Americans?

Deneisha Poe said...

The media posts what they want. They also choose what they will and won’t air.
My organization, The Black Panthers, held a rally and a food drive. . . . They would
not air it on the news. They didn’t want to show The Black Panthers doing positive
work. If we were involved in a shoot-out they would be first on the scene to expose
to the world our negative doings.

Could the media try to do a better job?
Connection to the other article- People are being held down because of where they stand. Not conforming to their standards and walking on pins and needles for them.

Emily Hines said...

"This reflects an intentional focus of exposing
theoretical, as well as ethical, commitments in writing and representation but
the lessons here extend into our exploration of educational research and new
ways of thinking about school and society. Just as education doesn’t just happen
in Building 39 Room 110, there are limitless and different contexts of learners
interacting with the world, all with existing contingent on place and particularity."

Do individuals benefit from learning with certain environmental contingencies, such as in specifically designated atmospheres?

Kristin Snyder said...

"Certainly, one could substitute race for gender and sexuality here, yielding a materialization of the familiar reprise of America's historical racial exploitation and oppression. What is significant, though is that globalization ensures an expedited proliferation of practices and literacies on scales never before dreamt of. This includes systemic forms of oppression, namely racism and sexism, proving Hardt and Negri's (2004) point that, in globalized spaces, fair and socially just representation is truly at stake."

Can the racism against African-Americans really be compared to objectification of women? While they are relatable, I feel like they are still two different types of injustices.

Trevor Gasdaska said...

"Globalizing processes, if not interrupted, accelerate these systems
of exploitation and oppression."

How can we change the oppressive social scripts into something that does not continue the trend of exploitation and oppression?

Lina Shahin said...

Page 327: "Just as education doesn't just happen in Building 39 Room 110, there are limitless and different contexts of learners interacting with the world, all with existing contingent on place and particularity."

Does the location of were learning takes place really affect how people receive knowledge?

Courtney Turner said...

"Identity—too often treated as an abstraction—in scholarship that takes the production and productive nature of space seriously, comes to the fore as part of a rhizomatic collection of forces. The usefulness of Critical Geography to the study of educational foundation, therefore, resides in the explicit call for study of the ways in which space, place, power, and identity are already, always intertwined and at work."

Question: Why is identity constantly considered an abstraction in a world where racism is so common? What exactly is Critical Geography and how is it driven to be connected with identity?

Megan Angel said...

"...a set of ideas and practices that when taken together organize both the way a society
defines certain truths about itself and the way it puts together social power. This
means race, gender, and sexuality have ideological dimensions that work to organize
social institutions."
I'm still confused as to what exactly discourse means. What would be an example?

Karina Gomez said...

"To the White residents, D.C. also seems to be this great place to live, but if there are problems the reason it is going down hill is because of the minorities. All the crime you usually see broadcasted on the news in our area are committed by minorities. Like White people don't commit crime."

Crime is usually committed by those living in poverty. If minorities are the ones living in poverty in D.C., then can it truly be stated that the media's coverage of crimes committed by minorities in the area is due to racial and bias views?

aagforster said...

"Globalization discourse situates the local (and thus all of us) in a place of subordination, as “the other within” of the global order. At worst it makes victims of localities and robs them of economic agency and self-determination"

How does globalization rob people of their self-determination? Globalization describes how the world is inter-connected and should not describe nor bring down an individuals determination nor self-interests or actions.

Mitchell Cook said...

"and societal recuperation 3 of once potent political rhetorics and causes. To remedy this, and to identify what challenges and problems exist for the multitude, one must start with the city as “possibilities machine” (Soja 1996, 81) where “to change life we must change space” (Lefebvre, 1991, 190)."

Are there no other way for a life to change than changing the place/space it exists in?

Kristen Church said...

"Eric Zencey (1996) advocates for a shift toward “rooted education” that takes to task what non-Black universities often perpetuate in the name of “multicultural inclusiveness,” that being a “politics of placeless identity rather than a politics of rootedness in place” ( 17)."

What exactly does he mean by "rooted education"? and would a non-black university be open to every race other than African Americans?

Olivia Chen said...

"The difficult task of understanding and adopting the theoretical frame of Critical Geography has become even more challenging due to the globalized spaces that people inhabit, spaces characterized by current trends toward measurement, assessment, and standardization--all of which normalize a certain way of conceiving and perceiving" (321).

"Scholars of educative practice should have been paying attention and should know this, as the fallacy of transparent space has been deftly revealed (Reynolds 1998) and the crucial observation has been made that 'without articulating something, we have no competing discourse, no competing social production of space' (Payne 2005, 500)" (323).

How has globalization affected racial and gender issues?

Kendall Cooper said...

"Often times, and increasingly more so within the current manifestation of globalization, state space and its ideological
accoutrements puts us in our place and creates a way of knowing that puts us in our space too" (Taylor & Helfenbein 321).

Why must we be put in our place? Who is to say that our space or place is one and not another? What defines these spaces and places?

Abria Harris said...

"Although the ideology that supports racism, and the conceptualization of racism, is apparent at times, the ideology at work to make suspects and subjects of women is nearly invisible due to the inattentiveness to language and the inability to see simultaneous relation between sexuality, gender, race, and materiality."

Although racism is clearly more apparent, should the other categories be looked at as less important?

Seth Jones said...

These students are, in many ways, the abstractions that scholars in
educations at suburban colleges and universities do not know but write about and construct anyway (Taylor and Helfenbein 320).
This is a very definite statement. Why do you believe some of these scholars do not extensively research this topic, going as far as sitting in on classes and extending out to personal lives?

Will Macey said...

"Although this student recognizes the failure of the city's effort to control the discourse, she interestingly points to the reality of 50 Cent's story: “fact not fiction.”"

What was meant by "control the discourse?" What should the city's role be in influencing culture?

Christiana Tiburzi said...

'What is significant, though is that globalization ensures an ex- pedited proliferation of practices and literacies on scales never before dreamt of.'

what part of globalization is the cause of this change?

AlexMelton said...

"Although the ideology that supports racism, and the conceptualization of
racism, is apparent at times (and clear to this student), the ideology at work to
make suspects and subjects of women is nearly invisible due to the inattentiveness
to language and the inability to see simultaneous relation between sexuality, gender, race, and materiality."

My question would be: If we are consciously trying to create "equal rights" for minority groups by providing them with special services, (scholarships as an example) isn't this still a form of racism? Is the goal equality for all or is it retribution for the past?