Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Response for Thursday 3/29

Briefly describe similarities that you see (or would have like to have seen) in the two articles, "Mapping Everyday" and "Indigenous Resistance". Feel free to expand/expound on themes introduced by others on this post.

37 comments:

Sam Avolis said...

In reading both texts, many parallels can be drawn between the discriminations and negligence which seems to be placed upon minorities, in both our country and others. In the case of the Salish tribe, both the US and Canada treated the tribe as an item, or a piece of property, not recognizing the natural rights and boundaries of the tribe and treating them as objects. In the case of the newest article, much attention is given to the black population and the women, especially those in the DC area. A negative connotation is shown to have been placed on these groups, much of this seemingly due to the media. Many of the student accounts in the article state that the media chooses what it wants to show. And much, if not all, of the reports relating to these groups, specifically the blacks, show the negative sides of the race rather than the positive side. An especially interesting account spoke of the Black Panther party, a notoriously controversial group which certainly has its ups and downs. The student told how when the Panthers held a food drive to try and aid those in need, the media gave this no attention for not wanting to hold the Panthers in a positive light. But however, as soon as the Black Panthers would do something a bit more controversial, the media would quickly jump on it to try and bring a negative image onto the party. Other accounts refer to the entire image of the black population which is portrayed to the impressionable youth. Many idolize figures such as rappers or pro athletes, few of which live an esteemed life style. The example given was rapper 50 cent, who in a 2005 movie billboard was shown holding a gun in one hand and a pistol in the other. With idols such as these, one can see how the stereotypes which can sometimes be placed upon the black race can come from. However, it is these stereotypes which lead to the wrongful discriminations.
The other group which much attention was given to was women. It is not a rare opinion to hear that women are subservient to men; that males are the dominant sex. What is it that makes these ideas come about? In the article, an example given is pornography. Many pornographic films portray women as objects for men, that they are nothing more than something to be used. One does not have to search too far to find an example of this in any sort of media, whether it be pornography, or a movie in the theaters. These portrayals are what lead to a common chauvinistic attitude in men today. And it is all of these instances in our country, from the common stereotypes applied to “at risk” individuals, to women, all the way back to the Salish tribe. That is not how people should be treated, but at the same time I do not think we intentionally treat people this way. To me, it seems as if these stereotypes have gone on for so long that it is more of just an ingrained thing. We grow up being exposed to these same opinions and typecasts. Much of the blame seems to be on the media, through the news, movies, radio, television, whatever the medium may be. By having a population which is consistently exposed to these views, it begins to set in as a reality. It just takes a level head to cut through the red tape and actually witness something for itself. I enjoyed both of these articles, especially the second one, as they shed light upon many of the discriminations which we all view and most likely participate in, despite our believing them to be true.

Matt Michel said...

The second article reinforces the horrible history of racial segregation and discrimination in the United States. I could draw parallels between the Salish tribes in the Pacific Northwest and the plight of women and minorities in the 19th and 20th centuries. Most legislation that was passed “in the favor of” these minorities was essentially a lie. The Salish tribes fought to allow their children access to public schools. Once the children were allowed to attend public schools the racism of the local residents became apparent and the innocent Indian children were subject to horrible abuse from their classmates and teachers. The racial desegregation laws of the 1960’s also brought a new level of racism. Like the Salish children, the children of other minorities that were bused to predominantly white schools faced terrible racism from the entire school community. The plight of women can also be related to the segregation of the Salish tribes. When white settlers first moved to the area they took the ancient lands of these tribes and claimed them as their own property. The Indians that lived on this land where then forced to leave of pay taxes to their new landlords, essentially becoming property themselves. Women, to a high degree prior to the 1900’s but still today are sometimes viewed by men as property. No human being should ever “belong” to another, even in an unofficial manor.

Ludwig said...

Both of the readings referred to some type of discrimination towards a specific group of people. In the first article, it was discussed how there was animosity and abuse towards the Coastal Salish people. The USA and Canada were forcing assimilation onto the group of people and attempting to permanently change their way of life. The children of Salish families were the constant targets of non-Salish students in school and suffered through discrimination and racism. In the second article, it talks about how minorities and women are the targets of discrimination. Examples were given of students explaining the reality of the DC area and how the media only depicts the acceptable parts of the city. The media does not show how there are people in poverty and the suffering that occurs. Crimes, for the most part, are only made known to the public when they are committed by minorities and overlooked if committed by someone who is white. Blacks are the main minority who are targeted and are made seem as always being the source of problems. Aside from minorities, women are also seen more as “objects”. The example used in the texts refers to pornography and how it objectifies women. In pornography women are made to appear submissive and as the property of males. This contributes to the false sense that some men have, that they own women and that women have to do as men order them to do.
In my opinion, I believe that some of the things that society lives through are just plain wrong and ignorant. It is not right that people try to change the way of lives of others and try to make them resemble their own. It is also wrong that minorities are blamed for when things go wrong as if they were solely the only ones who commit mistakes. The ignorance of many people leads to situations as the ones that were depicted in both of the readings. This is something that has to stopped and changed for the better.

Lauren said...
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Lauren said...

Both of the articles we were asked to read share common themes: inequality and racism. In the first article, the Salish Indians are mistreated and expected to adapt to the norms of American and Canadian societies. Their culture is not respected; instead it is looked over. The Salish children are verbally abused and seen as outcasts within both the Canadian and American societies. Because of their differences, they became the focus of much harsh racism.
The second article shows how minorities in the United States are the usual targets of racism, especially African-American people and women. Once again because someone’s way of life and culture are different, they are mistreated and disrespected. Students of schools within DC provided an example of this. They explained that the media usually only shows the “acceptable” parts of town and only casts a negative light on the poorer parts of town. Crimes, which happen in all areas of towns by many different races of people, are only shown on the news when a minority commits it, or it is in a bad part of town. Also, women are given a negative connotation to. The best example provided of this is that of pornography. Most pornography portrays the woman as the object or “prize” for the man and nothing more than that. He “owns” her and can make her do or say whatever he wants her to. Because pornography is so readily available, this mentality in engrained in many minds and has pretty much become part of the culture within the United States.
I personally think that inequality is still a huge issue within modern society. Yes, huge strides have been made, but that does not mean that there are not still many more left to make. Society needs to learn to respect and embrace many different cultures and walks of life instead of require conformation if the culture does not fit that of a middle-class White perspective.

Kaitlyn Bochicchio said...

Both articles covered the discrimination of minorities in the United States. The first article discussed the issues of discrimination towards Native Americans living on the U.S.-Canadian border in the 1900s. The two countries decided that they wanted to assimilate these Indians into “modern” culture. They required that the children attend school. At these schools, the students were punished for speaking in their native tongue. The Canadian government put the Native Americans into schools with the rest of the population of Canada, where they were ostracized to the point of severe trauma. The United States put the Indians living on their side of the border into boarding schools. The boarding schools were specific to their race, so racial discrimination was less of an issue for those in the U.S., but not entirely absent.
The second article illustrated the stereotypes that we have in our own country, sometimes without even being recognized although they are oftentimes obvious. Discrimination is often placed upon the minorities, especially African Americans and women. The article gave an example that in Washington, D.C., the only crimes that are covered on the media are those done by the poor minorities. When the media does cover the rich places of D.C., they often showcase the entire area as a great place to live. This is not an accurate representation of the area as a whole, and only shows that people “pick and choose” what to inform people about for the promotion of their own agenda. A second example given was how pornography has changed the views of women to men. America’s culture views women as objects of property that is to submit to the dominant gender’s wishes. Domestic violence and sex slavery are terrible results of this assumption.
I think that both articles covered eye-opening topics that are difficult to accept at first. It is important for people to understand in the Native Americans’ case that forcing people to assimilate without taking the time to learn about their background and why they think the way they do is meaningless; you’re not going to have much success. I think that if their culture isn’t hurting anyone, then the Indians should be left alone.
For the second article’s topic, I think that it is good to be aware of what you’re country’s culture actually is. Outside of reality, we depict as America being the “melting pot” of all races in cultures. America is supposed to be socially accepting of other people’s cultures and backgrounds. The truth is that America is full of discrimination problems in all areas. The good news is that by recognizing the problem exists, we have hope that it can be fixed.

Anne said...

In the article "Indigenous Resistance" by Michael Marker, he talks about the issue of Native Americans who were divided by the USA-Canada border. The Coast Salish people had to travel across the border often because of family and family events. Both the Americans and British refused that they be able to cross back in forth of the border and needed to remove them out of the way of development, in order to consolidate their empires. They also refused that they be able to learn about their natives past by going to schools that verbally abused them and forced them to forget about the history of their ancestors. In Canada, the schools were very religious and forced religion on the Coast Salish. They were also physically abused. In the USA, the schools were very racist and the natives experienced psychological trauma. The USA and Canada established boarding schools in order to get the Indians off their land. These experiences of being a student at boarding schools were known to be horrible and leaders often told the youth to avoid schooling. Eventually, Coast Salish parents saw boarding schools as a safe haven for their children who were experiencing racism and trauma. These boarding schools were intended for assimilation, but the Coast Salish made them into safe schools to avoid conditions they were facing at public schools. However, the schools starting allowing them to learn about their culture.
In the second article, it discusses racism and how minorities are usually the focuses of it, and how stereotypes are often being made based on where people are living. The southeast side of DC is often portrayed with a negative reputation. This area is the poor part of DC and the media casts a negative reputation by reporting all the negative things that happen there or believe happen there. There are never any mentioning’s of the positive things, but only reports on shootings and drugs. By stereotyping the southeast of DC, the media is preventing people from really looking past the negative events that have happened there and instead the people from this area are being treated disrespectfully. The article also discusses the negative suggestion of women. With pornography showing that women are prizes and men have control over what they do, this idea is what people believe.
After reading these articles, it is shows how inequality, stereotypes, and racism are still a problem today. Although it is better than it used to be, I think there are still some changes that need to made. People need to learn that just because one is a certain race or color there is no need to be disrespectful to one another.

Melissa Rineer said...

The subject matter of the two articles was extremely similar. The "Indigenous Resistance" article talked about the racial discrimination that the Salish tribes were subjected to; the "Mapping Everyday" article talked of the racial discrimination in the U.S. Both articles discuss how discrimination is fought against and then when laws are created to end (on the surface at least) the discrimination tends to worsen. Discrimination is a very real public issue that has been plauging various societies around the world for a long time and laws aimed at ridding us of it prove to be uneffective. Laws cannot change the minds of those discriminating and thus they cannot end discrimination.

Jennifer Loving said...

After reading the text Indigenous resistance and racist schooling on the borders of empires: Coast Salish cultural survival and Mapping Every Day: Gender, Blackness and Discourse in urban texts, one can see the similarities of the themes: racialism and inequality, neither of which is morally acceptable. In the article about the Coast Salish, a group of Indians were stripped from their heritage and culture and place into segregated schools without any say so. The Indians were not even allowed to speak their own language. The change was detrimental and caused various psychological problems. The second article, Mapping everyday showed how minorities and women are a common victims of discrimination in the United States. When the media discriminates them, they’re treating the women or blacks unfairly from the simple reason of being different, much of which comes from the media. As an example, students explained how DC was the main town focused on. However, instead of focusing on the optimistic characteristics of the town, the media focused of the negative. The media did not make citizens aware of the struggles and suffering these people were going through. Yet, crime was easily discussed if a minority committed an illegal act. As another example, pornography was discussed and how women are portrayed as objects to men. This is one reason, men feel as if they “own” women and they cannot complete equivalent job tasks as men. Still today, inequality is a current problem. I believe everyone should be treated equally, and new cultures and heritage should be embraced. No one person or government has the right to strip someone of their culture, with nothing left but to tell stories. Although, steps have been taken to settle these issues, society should attempt to come together and make these changes once and for all!

Daniel Marko said...
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Krista Smith said...

“Mapping Everyday” and “Indigenous Resistance” both relate to inequality. In
Mapping Everyday,” it talked about how terribly inequality was affecting their society. Not only were the Salish Indians expected to change their ways to be more the Americans and Canadians, but they were also treated very poorly and faced a lot of racism. Just because other people have their own beliefs and are of a different race, does not mean they should be mistreated. It’s hard to hear how individuals were discriminated against just for being different. I always thought that everyone was supposed to be unique but that is not the case. The article “Indigenous Resistance” talked about how our own country, the United States, faces the largest amount of racism. For a long time now, all women and the African-Americans faced racism the most. Over time, it has gotten better but a good amount of racism in the United States still exists. Women are thought to be “housewives” and “mothers” and not taken as seriously as men. Women still face challenges when searching for a job or even when discussing their salaries. Just because men are thought to be better than women, does not mean they are. Everyone is equal and should be given equal opportunities. African-American people still are discriminated against as well and are looked at differently than Americans. This should not be occurring in a country where everyone is supposed to be equal.

Daniel Marko said...

In a recently read article: Indigenous resistance and racist schooling on the borders of empires: Coast Salish cultural survival by Michael Marker it easy to see a correlation between the article and another article titled: Mapping Everyday: Gender, Blackness, and Discourse in Urban Contexts. The correlation present between the two articles is racism.
Indigenous resistance discusses the integration of Native Indians known as Coast Salish into American and Canadian culture. In British Columbia, the Salish Indians were brought into public schools, mixing them with other Canadian citizens. This has caused racism because the Indians are very different, not just by culture, but even physical features. They do not do anything wrong or erratic, and they are not recognized for what they do right.
Mapping Everyday has the issue, except not with Indians, but African Americans. African Americans are mainly the residents of Southeast Washington D.C. and current events from that area are often very negative. Because of this, S.E. D.C. has come to have a terrible reputation, and nothing positive that occurs in the neighborhood is ever advertised. People have come to the conclusion that this is a form of racism.
I do not agree with the second article, as it is a crime-infested area. I have been to S.E. D.C. and I would never consider it a safe and satisfying place to live. I don’t believe this was a good example of how there still is racism. I believe large-scale racism is present, but it is not against African Americans anymore. Our President is colored, so I believe colored people have the same opportunity as other races. I personally don’t believe race, color, religion, etc. should ever be a factor in anything. I think that demographics are the start of racism, as we are measured about how we are different. I believe people should be treated at the same level, until their background and personality is really understood.

Samantha said...

After reading both of the articles assigned to us in class, I realized how much racism and inequality existed in our society. The first article was Salish people and how they were forced to go to a school in America or Cananda, where the children were treated terribly and punished because of their race. An American child or a Canadian child could get away with anything, yet the indigenous children would get blamed for every thing that went wrong. Racism was very obvious in this article, the children were punished for speaking the only language they knew how to speak. This is not right and the worst part is the Salish did not choose to go to the schools, they were forced to attend.
The second article, "Mapping Everyday", was similar in the aspect of inequality and racism. In many parts of the United States, the minorities and women are displayed as the underdogs or objects in a sense. Minorities, especially African Americans, are shown in the news for crimes and wrong doings, while the whites that commit crimes are kept quiet and under the media. Also, the bad parts of town are displayed with negative connotations. Women are shown are the objects of men, an example that stood out to me in the article was pornography. Women are just there for the men's disposal.
The points made in the articles are harder to point out in today's society, but we should not be able to point it out if we tried. Sure major steps have been made to improve inequality and racism, but it should not take this long to get rid of them altogether. Every person deserves an equal chance in every aspect of life.

Johnathon Owen said...

Both pieces illuminate discrimination against minorities in several social science area. The "Indigenous Resistance" piece illuminates how the American and Canadian governments used psychological elements to influence the minds of the indigenous peoples into thinking that their heritage was wrong, and by forcing a new life upon them.
The "Mapping Everyday" article, another form of discrimination is addressed. The discrimination in this article is centralized on African- Americans living in the South Eastern Washington D.C. area. The women in this area are portrayed to be more objects than people. The people living in the surrounding area view this African- American community as a crime- ridden wasteland, when in fact much good could be coming from that area.
Both pieces' main points are concerned with discrimination within a certain region. I believe that it is disgusting to see that discrimination has ruined the lives of people on an international scale.

RShumate said...

“Mapping Everyday” and “Indigenous Resistance” both deal with inequality in America. In “Indigenous Resistance” we learned about the Salish people and how they were integrated into American and Canadian schools. In America, to avoid issues, the Slaish were placed in boarding schools, however in Canada the Salish were integrated into the regular school systems which caused many issues due to their differences. In “Mapping Everyday” we see prime examples of racism and inequality in America. Amongst gender, women are seen as inferior in our society. In my Sociology class one of the main topics we looked at was gender in the workforce. There are very few women CEOs in our society because women are not seen as effective leaders. African Americans have been at the center of racism since the founding of our country. Also in my Sociology class we examined how African Americans are less likely to receive a call back for a job when they are applying against a white person. A lot of changes have been made in the past decades for the good. We are slowly moving towards a society in which race and gender does not matter, but we are still a long way away from true equality.

Rebeccas Albright said...

In both articles, there are many parallels presented between them. Both articles displayed segration between two groups of people and how America destroyed their cultures. In "Indigenous Resistance", Americans tried to assimilate them to their culture and stripping away any type of originality they had. In "Mapping Everyday", African American and Women are discriminated against for their race/sex and not culture. Women are seen as inferior to men and there is a "glass ceiling" when it comes to careers and jobs. African Americans are always seen as criminals or dumb compared to others, and that is the biggest form of discrimination. Also, in "Indigenous Resistance", they used psychological discrimination rather than physical discrimination displayed in "Mapping Everyday". Both articles show how mean America used to be and how discrimination has always been a problem, even though our motto is "live free" and "all men are equal" when obviously they used to not be.

Eva said...

Marker's "Indigenous Resistance" and today's piece "Everyday Mapping" both pertain to the discrimination and racism felt by minorities in the Coast Salish areas and Washington D.C., respectively. Marker's work shed light on the atrocities the Salish children experienced such as unfair treatment and punishment without justification, among other things such as being forced to attend schools with American and Canadian children. "Everyday Mapping" touched on how racism and discrimination are still prominent in the United States even though our country seems to take pride in the fact that we are such a multicultural society, accepting of all races and backgrounds. The article demonstrates how discrimination against inequity is placed on minorities as well as women. The piece illustrates how often times news reports include the crimes those of African American descent have committed, but overlook crimes committed by Cacasians.
Evidently, us readers are able to see how although the United States is a developed nation with free rights to people of all races and genders, racism is unfortunately most certainly still existent.

Megan T Stahl said...

"Indigenous Resistance" is about the Coast Salish people and how they often had to travel back and forth between Canada and Washington State in order to see family, etc. One thing they would absolutely not compromise on was their tradition. Because the Coast Salish were looked at as "invading" another country other than their own, they were expected to assimilate. On one hand I understand that a country wasn't to function as a whole unit but on the other hand I think it is very wrong to mistreat a people group because they want to keep traditions. Unless they are physically threatening and harming the community, there is no reason for them to change how they are.
The other article "Mapping Everyday" talked about minorities and their role in society, or lack there of. In today's society, certain minorities are often looked at as the "bad guy". And they're mistreated because of it. This goes hand in hand with the previous article because, today, minorities are looked as having to assimilate to "white" culture because that's "American". Minorities shouldn't be stripped of their tradition like the Coast Salish.
In America, we are all free. Every minority, everybody. Everyone is different and we all have a right to be happy. The pursuit of happiness. There is no pursuit of happiness if certain groups of people should not keep their own traditions.

David Porter said...

The two pieces both talk about inequality and discrimination. In indigenous resistance it talks about how discrimination was shown towards an entire race. The salish people were expected to change their culture and way of life all together. Their differences were not accepted and expected to be changed. In Everyday Mapping women and African Americans are discriminated against for their gender/race. Something that can not be physically changed, for the most part. This piece shows that racism and sexism still exist in America today.

Rebecca Purvis said...

There are many similarities between the subjects in the first and second articles. In the first article that we read, it was mainly about the segregation of the Coast Salish people when they managed to go to public schools. The second article is about the students in HBCU's that are from various parts of the world or places where inner city crime is high. Therefore, one of the main connections between the two articles is race and ethnicity. The main difference is that the second article focuses on the African American community while the first article focuses on the Coast Salish people.
The ways in which the articles were written were quite different. The second article had more monologue from students and I feel as though the first article would have been more interesting to read if it had the same type format as well.

IPatrick said...

The pieces “Indigenous Resistance” and “Mapping Everyday” both display discrimination towards minorities. “Indigenous Resistance” deals with American and Canadian government integrated Salish people into the schools. They forced the way of life they thought was best upon them.
The “Mapping Everyday” article deals with minorities in America. It shows how even though we are a very diverse melting pot society there is still discrimination. We take precedent of dark complexion peoples crimes over light complexion. Also women are seen as inferior to men with men getting jobs over women and men climbing ladders easily as compared to women.
Both are very effective in showing the racism and sexism of the time.

Krina Patel said...

Racial inequality was a common theme between the article “Indigenous resistance and racist schooling on the borders of empires: Coast Salish cultural survival” and “Mapping Everyday: Gender, Blackness and Discourse”. In “indigenous resistance”, the Indians were forced to go to segregated schools, leaving behind their heritage and culture. The second article, “Mapping Everyday”, talks about discrimination of minorities and women in the United States. Discrimination and inequality is a problem society still faces today even with all the laws that have been passed. In my opinion, everyone should be treated equally and should be given the same opportunities no matter what race or gender they are.

Necho Williams said...

Both articles, "Mapping Everyday" and "Indigenous Resistance" targeted minorities. I related to Mapping Everyday more so than Indigenous Resistance basically because I am a black male - and not apart of the majority. Mapping Everyday tells about the inequality that individuals face essentially because of race and gender. It heavily speak volumes. From first hand experience, I have had teachers who interacted with the "majorities" and not the "minorities." Same with women. The list continues. Racism indeed does exist and sexism does too.

Yamila Monge said...

The subject matter of both articles is very much alike. The "Indigenous Resistance" article discussed the racial discrimination that was experienced by the Salish. The "Mapping Everyday" article talked about the racial discrimination in the U.S. Both of the articles explore the fact that once laws are made to help eradicate racial discrimination, it tends to only make the problem worse Discrimination is a very real problem that is experienced all over the world in many different forms whether it may racial, gender, or religious. And although many laws have been put into place to eradicate the problem nothing permanent really tends to take effect. Yes at times it does help but only for so long. And in the end we cannot change the minds of people. People are always going to think the way to want and no laws are going to change that. What needs to be done is people need to be educated because ignorance is the real issue at hand.

Kendra Jones said...

Having read both the articles, my yes have been opened up to a greater perspective of racism. The "Mapping Everyday" article was close to home because it was in the US, making it easier to understand. When reading the Salish article, it was more eye-opening for me. Both articles examine the racial discriminations towards minorities. I think both reads were extremely influential, and many should take the time to read them. It is important for people to get a true sense of how discrimination, prejudice, and stereotypes play a role in varying societies so that they can play an active role in combating them. If people can first recognize and distinguish the issues, they can then be held accountable to change or better their own behaviors.

Melissa Ferling said...

The two articles although about different things that happened at different periods in time have many similarities. The second article we read reinforces the fact that certain groups of people in society are unfairly treated and shows that we have not learned much from past mistakes. It can be argued that we don’t intentionally discriminate; the media plays a large role in the way that we look at certain people. Such as the advertisements of pro athletes and rappers and the way that women are portrayed in movies. Because of media we are brought up believing things about groups of people and do not even realize that we may be discriminating against them. I think that it is wrong to treat people differently just because they belong to a certain group of people and it becomes even worse when the government is guilty of this. I think it is safe to say that everyone does it, therefore it is going to take the efforts of everyone to put an end to it.

Kamcgoldrick said...

It was difficult to read these articles an attempt to relate to the issues these people were facing because I cannot relate. In "Indigenous resistance and racist schooling on the borders of empires: Coast Salish cultural survival" we learn how the Salish people were faced with laws requiring them to assimilate to an Anglo-christian idealism. White settlers used schools to make these native people more "socially acceptable" from their point of view. It is terrible that these people were stripped of a culture that meant so much to them by intruders. When reading "Mapping Everyday: Gender,
Blackness, and Discourse in
Urban Contexts" it was disheartening to read the comments of the youth in the D.C. area speak about how they are wrongly represented in the media. One girl made the blunt comment, "like white people don't commit crime" to convey the misconduct that certain races feel. The media can transform a story into something its not based on which angle they take. The Anglo-Saxon men who took over the Salish people believed they were saving souls and the media in D.C. believes they are making the people of D.C. more safe. Both told their story from one vantage point without regard to a different point of view.

Dylan Lilley said...

There are definitely some parallels in the two articles, “Mapping Everyday” and “Indigenous Resistance”. In the two articles, discrimination of minorities and women are the common issue. In the first article, the Salish people were discriminated against and were forced to abandon their culture, customs, and history. They were treated unfairly and had no voice or say in what was happening to them. In the second article, it talks about how minorities and women are mistreated in the same sense. African Americans are given harsh stereotypes and are put on the media for crimes that every race has committed. Women are viewed as coming second to men and are used as property and have no say in anything. I think all three of these cases have similar characteristics and it shows that inequality and racism has gone on for a good amount of time. I think that racism has somewhat been resolved by the younger generations and I think it is a less of an issue for our age group. It is still definitely a problem that needs to be worked on but I think it is heading in the right direction. I think that society tells us that men are still trying to control women today. It is a terrible issue that needs to be resolved. Hopefully people will continue to realize these issues and will continue to push for them to be stopped.

Randall Jernigan said...

This section of English 101 we are looking at the social sciences and we read two very similar pieces on discrimination. Michael Marker clearly described Indigenous concerns that happened throughout our countries past. While the Mapping Everyday piece was on more current events in Washington, D.C. Marker focused on Canada and the United States as the other piece focused on the District of Columbia 7th and 8th Wards. Michael Marker also uses explanations of how schools worked to marginalize them. This just added fuel to the fire and increased Aboriginal and Indigenous resistance.

Reid Trexler said...

These two articles had some similarities and some differences. Indigenous Resistance talked about the Coast Salish people and the discrimination involving their culture. Mapping Everyday talked about discrimination of African Americans due to various stereotypes. The two articles correlated in that they both discussed the discrimination of a particular race. In Indigenous Resistance, the author talked more about how the discrimination of the Salish people conflicted with education. Mapping Everyday, mentioned how different racial stereotypes could cause societal conflicts, such as crimes. Both articles signified the importance of equality. If any of are societal issues are going to be solved, it needs to begin with anti-discrimination.

Randall Jernigan said...
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tuyentru said...

"Education was the ultimate weapon of colonial conquest..."

In the article "Indigenous Resistance and Racist Schooling on the Borders of Empires: Coast Salish Cultural Survival” by Michael Marker the concept of failed assimilation is truly realized among other things. Marker reiterate over and over again the power that education has upon any individuals. Education has the power to erase, corrupt, and change a person.

In the article "Mapping Everyday" the same may be said. The frame and marker of assimilation and education. Both the Salish and the women of DC are seemed to be forced into a mold society has set up for them.

I found both articles significant representations of molds that are set but sometimes can't be filled.

Shraddha Sainath said...

Both the articles, "Indigenous Resistance" and "Mapping Everyday" seem to have striking similarities because they are based on the same theme of how racism and discrimination has affected the lives of the people who are considered as minorities. This includes the tribal, the African-Americans and women.
The first article “Indigenous Resistance” is based on how the Coastal Salish people who were the inhabitants of the borderlands region had to bear the brunt of contrasting policies of two different empires. Political borders were drawn between US and Canada, separating the tribal families into two different parts of the world, and they had no choice but to travel across borders to attend family functions. The children had to face maximum consequences. They were forced to adapt to new schooling policies. They were ill treated in schools and punished for speaking in their native languages.
The second article emphasizes on the discriminations that the Afro-Americans and women were subjected to. Media always portrayed the good side of posh DC and negative connotations of the poorer side of DC. It was wrong on their part to show that Afro-Americans are the ones who are always involved in bad deeds and blot out the crimes of the whites. Women are being treated as mere ‘objects’ due to the readily available things like pornography. Thus women are being disrespected, treated inferior and not given equal opportunities as men.
Every human being is equal and their rights shouldn’t be biased based on the clans and families they are born in or their gender. Everyone must be allowed to live the life they deserve. Discrimination and the word ‘minority’ itself should be eradicated.

sosborne said...

Similarities certainly exist between the two pieces. Both articles touch on the discrimination of racial and/or gender groups in different regions. In both instances, a strong sense of superiority in the dominant race exists as well as the idea that a mixing of the races will "level the playing fields." This could never be more false. Legislation to intermix cultures are not quick fixes. As seen with the Salish children, when they were entered into public schools, they were subject to abuse by their classmates, punished for their culture, and stripped of their identity. Likewise, desegregation of schools in the 1960s caused a lot of violence and even heightened animosity toward African Americans. Throughout history we have seen discrimination of women in society as well. Although we are not seen as the chattel we once were, women are still highly objectified and portrayed as sexual objects. Pornography and media outlets display women in hypersexualized positions making us items for male pleasure. Men are socialized into viewing women in this way. Young boys learn that it is socially accepted and even expected that they objectify women. At the same time, women are socialized to view beauty, youthfulness, and sex appeal as main goals. All in all, society has done a poor job of breaking down racial and gender barriers. Dominant groups try to force other groups to assimilate rather than accept them and their culture in its entirety.

Abbie said...

In both pieces, "Mapping Everyday" and "Indigenous Resistance," discrimination seems to be the common issue. In “Indigenous Resistance,” the main problem was education changing the traditions of the Salish people. American’s and Canadian’s were constantly trying to force the Salish people to conform to their way which caused a split in families, dividing them between Canada and America. Education only caused a greater split because the school systems were forcing their ways upon the Salish people. In “Mapping Everyday,” women and Afro-Americans are discriminated against through the media. Women are seen constantly as sex objects. There is never a beer commercial showing a sexy many fetch a women her beer. Afro-Americans are seen through the media as “the bad guy.” In movies and on the news, we are constantly seeing black men as targets for crime. These discriminations and stereotypes are engraved in our brains. So where does the discrimination stop, or will it ever stop? I believe there will always be discrimination against some race or some type of person. Discrimination is a never ending cycle.

cameroncrazy304 said...
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Randall Fulghum said...

“Indigenous Resistance” and “Mapping Everyday” each speak about areas of inequality in the United States of America. “Indigenous Resistance” deals with the integration of the Salish people into Canadian and American Schools. They were placed in boarding schools in America, but in Canada they were placed in regular schools which caused issues. “Mapping Everyday” shows examples of inequality and racism in America. Unfortunately, sometimes women are viewed as inferior in our society. African Americans have also been historically ridiculed due to their race in American History. Each article deals with the unfortunate inequalities that are still alive in America today.