Friday, September 14, 2012

Bioregionalism Defined

Please post your provisional definition of bioregionalism or bioregional literacy below.  This will be the term that you operationalize in your thesis, in order to comment on Gary Snyder's poems in Turtle Island AND your own chosen place (re: its environmental concerns/qualities).  Lastly, provide an in-text citation and a full citation, as would appear in a Works Cited list, at the end of your quote.  Feel free to use the NCSU citation builder.

66 comments:

Raleigh Adams said...

“Bioregionalism is neither a monolithic school of thought nor a unified environmental movement” (Li, 57).

Li, Huey-Li. "BIOREGIONALISM AND GLOBAL EDUCATION: a REEXAMINATION." Educational Theory 53.1 (2005): 55-73. Web.

Dustin Bizub said...

Bioregionalism can be defined as "a body of thought concerned with contemporary society's disconnection from its natural base" (Davidson 318). What this means, is that the belief of bioregionalism is largely connected to the environmental movements that advocate the breakdown of current civilization in favor of a form of living that is less detrimental towards the planet on which we live.


Davidson, Stewart. "The Troubled Marriage of Deep Ecology and Bioregionalism." Environmental Values 16.3 (2007): 313-332. NCSU Libraries. Web. 12 Sept. 2012. .

Kyle Anderson said...

Bioregionalism - an ecological movement committed to developing communities integrated with their natural ecosystems (Frenkel 289).


Frenkel, Stephen. "Old Theories in New Places? Environmental Determinism and Bioregionalism." The Professional Geographer 46.3 (1994): 289. Web.

adrian ross said...

"Bioregionalism is taking to the time to learn the possibilities of place. It is a mindfulness of local environment, history, and community aspirations that leads to a sustainable future." (Wann)


Wann, David. "Why a Bioregional Approach." Sustainability Now!. Dr. R. Warren Flint, 1 Sept. 2010. Web. .

Lina Shahin said...

According to Rowan Gary in his article A philosophy for a sustainable future and a hypothetical transition strategy for Armidale, New South Wales, Australia he defines bioregionalism as the following: Bioregionalism can be defined firstly through its concern for ‘place’ and the strong connection between community and the biophysical environment that reinforces an ethic of ecological responsibility (Gray 791).

Work Cited
Gray, Rowan. "Practical Bioregionalism." A Philosophy for a Sustainable Future and a Hypothetical Transition Strategy for Armidale, New South Wales, Australia (2007): 790-806. Web. 14 Sept. 2012.

Courtney Turner said...

"Bioregionalism calls for human society to be more closely related to nature, and to be more conscious of its locale, or region, of life-place. it is a proposal to ground human cultures within natural systems, to get to know one's place intimately in order to fit human communities to the Earth, not distort the Earth to our demands," (Corcoran 6).

Corcoran, Peter B., and Eric Sievers. "Reconceptualizing Environmental Education: Five Possibilities." Journal of Environmental Education 25.4 (1994): 6-7. Web. 12 Sept. 2012.

Adrian Taylor said...
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Bryan Britt said...

"Bioregionalism is a body of thought and related practice that has evolved in response to the challenge of reconnecting socially-just human cultures in a sustainable manner to the region-scale ecosystems in which they are irrevocably embedded" (McGinnis page 1).
McGinnis, Michael V, ed. Bioregionalism. New York: Routledge, 1999. Print.

Caroline Miller said...

"Bioregionalism claims that interaction between the biophysical and human components of a region generates place-based environmental and social understanding and concern, which lead to locally shared power and responsibility in cooperative land management and governance." (Pfueller, 173).

Pfueller, Sharron L. "Role of Bioregionalism in Bookmark Biosphere Reserve, Australia." Enviromental Conservation 35.02 (2008): 173-186. Web. 14 Sept. 2012. .

Adrian Taylor said...

"Bioregionalism looks at places as if they should be governed by nature not legislature” (Lang 416).

Lang, William L. "Bioregionalism and the History of Place." Oregon Historical Quarterly 103.4 (2002): 414-419. Web. 13 Sept. 2012.

Cody Davidson said...

Bioregionalism is the notion that nature is everywhere. It is all around not matter where or in what region that one lives. Bioregionalism is a fairly recent concept because it was only first conceived in the 1970's (Lang 416). Many have given a definition for bioregionalism. Peter Burg and Raymond Dasmann said that is was "both to a geographical terrain and a terrain of consciousness -- to a place and the ideas that have developed about how to live in that place" (Lang 416). "Governed by nature, not legislature" is what Kirkpatrick Sale said about the beliefs of bioregionalism (Lang 416). These ideas claim that bioregionalism is a free-spirited view and is not simply about physical places, but about attitudes and principles.

Works Cited:

Lang, William L. “Bioregionalism and the History of Place.” Oregon Historical Quarterly. 103.4 (Winter, 2002): 414-419. JSTOR. Web. 12 Sept. 2012.

Caroline Bojarski said...

Bioregionalism can be defined as "a body of thought concerned with contemporary society's disconnection from its natural base" (Davidson 318). This means that bioregionalism is basically the study of how society is disconnected from the natural world.

Davidson, and Stewart. "The Troubled Marriage of Deep Ecology and Bioregionalism." Environmental Values 16.3 (2007): 313-332. Print.

Geoff said...

'Bioregionalism' is a term referring to an action-oriented movement based on ecological principles. It has not been strong in academic geography, though it clearly has space and place as its concerns.(McTaggart 307)

McTaggart, WD. "BIOREGIONALISM AND REGIONAL-GEOGRAPHY - PLACE, PEOPLE, AND NETWORKS." Web of Science (1993): 307-319. Web. 14 Sept. 2012.

Taylor Morgan said...

Bioregionalism is a set of beliefs that is similar to environmentalism in the desire to live in harmony with nature. Bioregionalism steers away from the consumer culture and a homogenized economy and instead focuses on a more localized way of life. Under the beliefs of bioregionalism, political boundaries would be made to match ecological boundaries, local foods would be consumed and local materials would be used whenever possible, native plants would be cultivated, a sustainable society that lived in harmony with its specific bioregion would be the ultimate goal, and the unique ecology of the local bioregion would be emphasized through the use of local resources. An apt summary of the core values of bioregionalism is as follows: “The aim of bioregionalism is to help our human cultural, political and social structures harmonize with natural systems.” (Plant, 1990, p. 13).

Plant, Christopher, and Judith Plant. Turtle Talk: Voices for a Sustainable Future. Philadelphia, PA: New Society, 1990. Print.

Martin Rivas said...

"[Bioregion] refers to both a geographical terrain and a terrain of consciousness - to a place and the ideas that have developed about how to live in that place" (Lang 416)


Lang, William L. "Bioregionalism and the History of Place." Oregon Historical Quarterly 103.4 (2002): 414-419. Web. 14 Sept. 2012. .

ErnieR said...

The term bioregionalism can be defined as, “A philosophy and social movement grounded in the concept of ecologically sustainable human communities that exist in harmony with their natural surroundings” (Kahn 125).

Kahn, Cub. "THE BIOREGIONAL PARADIGM: APPLICATIONS TO STS EDUCATION." Bulletin of Science Technology & Society 13(1993): 125-127. Web. 14 Sept. 2012.

Jaleeza Brown said...

"Bioreginalism is a body of thought and related practice that has evolved in response to the challenge of reconnecting socially-just human cultures in a sustainable manner to the region-scale ecosystem in which they are irrevocably embedded" (Mcginnis 13).


Mcginnis, Michael V, ed. Bioregionalism. New York: Routledge, 1999. 13. Web. 13 Sept. 2012.

Perry Fountain said...

Bioregionalism can be defined as a way of thinking that has changed over the years due to the hardships of rekindling the way humans live so that larger regions have a say in how humans live and interact too. (Aberley 12). It is what connects humans with the environment.

Aberley, Doug. "Bioregionalism." Articles On Bioregionalism. R Outledge, 2005. Web. 13 Sept. 2012.

Emily Hines said...

Bioregionalism is a concept that has evolved to link humanity with the environment (Molnar 50). Expansion of bioregional thought is a vital process for a healthy relationship with nature (Molnar 53). This movement is integral for the development of a sustainable future for mankind.

Works Cited:
Molnar, Stephen. Environmental Change and Human Survival. NJ: Prentice Hall Inc, 2000.

Zeke Hartner said...

Becoming connected to a place is human nature. Becoming so enraptured with an area or ideal that the thought of separation or change is physically painful? That's something else entirely. This primal link to a specific area is what fuels the concepts of bioregionalism. In his article, Old Theories in New Places, Stephen Frenkel defines bioregionalism as "... A contemporary environmental movement containing deterministic ideas similar to those of Geography's environmental determinism."(Frenkel, p.1) This is as good of a working definition of bioregionalism as can be found, as most of what this movement stands for is self-defined.

Stephen Frenkel (1994): Old Theories in New Places? Environmental Determinism and Bioregionalism , The Professional Geographer, 46:3, 289-295 

Gregory Fields said...

This is my provisional definition of bioregionalism: “bioregionalism claims that interaction between the biophysical and human components of a region generates place-based environmental and social understanding and concern, which lead to locally shared power and responsibility in cooperative land management and governance.”(Pfueller, 173)

Pfueller, Sharron L. "Role of bioregionalism in Bookmark Biosphere Reserve, Australia."Environmental Conservation. 35.02 (2008): 173-186. Print. http://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0376892908004839>.

Katie Magee said...

In Dozeal’s paper, titled “Literary Activism, Social Justice, and the Future of Bioregionalism”, bioregionalism is defined as “a movement that advocates land management policies consistent within bioregions or ecoregions” (Dozeal 2).

Dozeal, Joshua A. "Literary Activism, Social Justice, and the Future of Bioregionalism." Ethics & the Environment 13.1 (2008): 2. Web. 13 Sept. 2012. .

Sarah Beebe said...

“A geographical terrain and a terrain of consciousness – to a place and the ideas that have developed about how to live in that place (Lang, 414)."

Lang, William L. "Bioregionalism and the History of Place." Oregon Historical Quarterly 103.4 (2002): 414-419. Web. 14 Sept. 2012. .

Shelby Snedecor said...
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Andrew Benson said...
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Chelsi Oxendine said...

“The requirement of a fundamental change in beliefs, attitudes, and values concerning the interaction of humans with their natural environment distinguishes bioregionalism from other forms of ecosystem management and provides the theoretical basis for managing resources as an interrelated whole.” (Diffenderfer 1)

Diffenderfer, Mark, and Dean Birch. "Bioregionalism: a Comparative Study of the Adirondacks and the Sierra Nevada." Society & Natural Resources an International Journal 10.1 (2008): 3-16. Web. 12 Sept. 2012. .

Andrew Benson said...

Bioregionalism can be defined through "its concern for ‘place’ and the strong connection between community and the biophysical environment that reinforces an ethic of ecological responsibility" (Gray 790).


Gray, Rowan. "Practical Bioregionalism: a Philosophy for a Sustainable Future and a Hypothetical Transition Strategy for Armidale, New South Wales, Australia." Futures 39.7 (2007): 790-806. Web. 13 Sept. 2012.

Shelby Snedecor said...

"Bioregionalism is the contemporary North American ecological movement committed to developing communities integrated with ecosystems" (Frenkel 289).

Frenkel, Stephen. "The Professional Geographer." Old Theories in New Places? Environmental Determinism and Bioregionalism 46.3 (1994): 289-295. Web. 10 Sept. 2012.

Rachel Leonard said...

“becoming native to a place through becoming aware of the particular ecological relationships that operate within and around it. '

and

“following the necessities and pleasures of life as they are uniquely presented by a particular site, and evolving ways to ensure long-term occupancy of that site. (Ethics, 6)"

Walton, D., J.A. Thomas, and V. Dravitzki. "Commuters' Concern for the Environment and Knowledge of the Effects of Vehicle Emissions." Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment 9.4 (2004): 335-340. Web. Sept. & Oct. 2012.


AlexMelton said...

"What is a Bioregion? A geographical area described in terms of its unique combination of plants, animals, geology, climate and water features – an area defined by natural boundaries and distinct living communities – the whole of which distinguishes it from other bioregions. A bioregion refers both to geographical terrain and a terrain of consciousness – to a place and the ideas that have developed about how too live in that place. Thus, natural forms and living communities, including human, become the descriptive features of each bioregion – instead of the politically drawn lines used to define county, state and nation" (Flint, p.1)

Bioregionalism is the belief that ecological boundaries should be aligned to political and economic boundaries. In theory, this would encourage consumption of only the resources in one’s bioregion, and importing would be limited. By eliminating many of the ideas of consumerism, bioregionalism aims to make each bioregion independently sustainable.


Flint, Warren R. "Why a Bioregional Approach?" Sustainability Now!. N.p., 1 Sept. 2010. Web. 14 Sept. 2012.

sydney wilkinson said...

A bioregion is a geographical area described in terms of its unique combination of plants, animals, geology, and distinct living communities (Flint).

Biolregionalism is a movement centered on a mindset that people are aware of and appreciate the bioregion they reside in. And ultimately that the human race begins to live in harmony with nature, and desire not only to use nature but also preserve it (Taylor, 50).

Warren, Flint. "Why a Bioregional Approach?"
Sustainability Now!. N.p., 10 Sept. 2010. Web.
13 Sept. 2012.


Taylor, Bron. ""Bioregionalism: an Ethics of Loyalty to
Place"." Landscape Journal (2000): 50-72. Web.
13 Sept. 2012.


Olivia Chen said...

"Bioregionalisation is the partitioning of large ecosystems into functionally distinct sub-units, facilitates ecosystem modeling, management and conversation (Ward 1)."


Peter Ward, Angus Atkinson, Hugh J. Venables, Geraint A. Tarling, Mick J. Whitehouse, Sophie Fielding, Martin A. Collins, Rebecca Korb, Andrew Black, Gabriele Stowasser, Katrin Schmidt, Sally E. Thorpe, Peter Enderlein, "Food web structure and bioregions in the Scotia Sea: A seasonal synthesis", Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography, Volumes 59–60, January 2012, Pages 253-266, ISSN 0967-0645, 10.1016/j.dsr2.2011.08.005.

Emily Boyette said...

According to Peter Berg of the Plane Drum Foundation, the term bioregionalism can be defined as "a geographic area defined by natural characteristics, including water sheds, landforms, soils, geological qualities, native plants and animals, climate, and weather...[which] includes human beings as a species in the interplay of these natural characteristics."52 (Ewert, 439).

Ewert, Sara D. "Bioregional Politics: the Case for Place." Oregon Historical Quarterly 103.4 (2002): 439-451. Web. 14 Sept. 2012. .

Mitchell Cook said...

Bioregionalism can be defined as: "Both a geographical terrain and a terrain of consciousness of a place and the ideas that have developed about how to live in that place." and "The importance given to natural systems, both as the source of physical nutrition and as the body of metaphors from which our spirits draw sustenance." (Lang, 416)

Lang, William L. "Bioregionalism and the History of Place." Oregon Historical Quarterly 103.4 (2002): 414-419. Web. 14 Sept. 2012.

Nikola Milisav said...

A bioregion is more than just a large piece of land; it is a "terrain of consciousness" and a place where "ideas hae developed on how to live in that place". These areas should also be "governed by nature, not legislature" (Lang).

Lang, William L. "Boiregionalism and the History of Place." Oregon Historical Quarterly 103.4 (2002): 414-419. Web. 12 Sept. 2012.

Mikeyd said...

Bioregionalism to me is understanding how humans have affected a region and it's inhabitants, and how humans have the "increasing ability to direct and control the forces of nature, their seemingly ever-expanding technologies, and the continual reorganization of production processes"(Robbins, 419)to exert a harmful effect on the landscapes of the bioregion.

Robbins, Williams G. "Bioregional and Cultural Meaning: the Problem with the Pacific Northwest." Oregon Historical Quarterly 103.4 (2002): 419-427. Web. 13 Sept. 2012.

Sam Roberson said...

"Bioregionalism is an
emerging field in the new
ecological worldview. It's
concerned with reshaping
our understanding of
human identity in relationship
to place, to ecosystem and to
nature" (Heffern 23)

Heffern, Rich. "Forest Expert Walks the Talk of Bioregionalism." National Catholic Reporter, Aug. 2004. Web. Sept. 2012.

Abria Harris said...

A bioregion is an area defined by its natural boundaries, and is “posited on the idea that the human community is only one of the communities on any given part of the planet, and that the other communities — plant life, animal life, mineral life — inside the landscape with its watershed divisions, its soil types, its annual rainfall, its temperature extremes, all of that constitutes a biome, an ecosystem, or, as they like to say, a natural nation.”

Messersmith-Glavin, Paul. "Between Social Ecology and Deep Ecology: Gary Snyder’s Ecological Philosophy." The Anarchist Library. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Sept. 2012.

Christiana Tiburzi said...

Bioregionalism is known as the interaction between the biophysical and human components of a region that generates place-based environmental and social understanding and concern.

Citation: SHARRON L. PFUELLER (2008). Role of bioregionalism in Bookmark Biosphere Reserve, Australia. Environmental
Conservation,35, pp 173186
doi:10.1017/S0376892908004839

Deneisha Poe said...

Bioregionalism is defined as a concern with society being disconnected for its natural base. (Davidson, p 318)
Davidson, Steward. "The Troubled Marriage of Deep Ecology and Bioregionalism." Environmental Values 16.3 (2007): 313-332. Web. 13 Sept. 2012.

Kendall Cooper said...

Bioregionalism is understanding the importance of place as well as its history.

http://www.sustainability-now.org/bioregionalism.htm

Ben Cogsdale said...

Bioregionalism can be defined as A diffused but philosophically sophisticated social movement, emphasizing the importance of the sense of place and a locally responsible stewardship of Nature (Parsons, 1)


Parsons, James J. "On "Bioregionalism" and "Watershed Consciousness"." The Professional Geographer 37.1 (2010): 1. Web. 13 Sept. 2012.

Alexis Cope said...

Bioregionalism involves creating ecological barriers between humans and nature, but is also about the link that civil society and the natural world have. Bioregionalism can also link together other branches of the environmental movement. (Carr)

Bioregionalism and Civil Society: Democratic Challenges to Corporate Globalism by Mike Carr
Review by: Peter Mulvihill
Canadian Journal of Political Science / Revue canadienne de science politique , Vol. 39, No. 2 (Jun., 2006), pp. 440-441

Jack Walsh said...

“Bioregionalism acknowledges that we do not only live in cities, towns, villages, and country sides; we also live in watersheds, ecosystems, and Eco regions.” (Flint)



Flint, Warren R. "Why a Bioregional Approach." Sustainability Now. Sustainability Now, 1 Sept. 2010. Web. 13 Sept. 2012. .

Vinicius Taguchi said...

"A contemporary environmental movement containing deterministic ideas similar to those of geography’s environmental determinism" (Frenkel 3).

Frenkel, Stephen. "Old Theories in New Places? Environmental Determinism and Bioregionalism∗." The Professional Geographer 46.3 (1994): 289-95. Taylor & Francis Online. 15 Mar. 2010. Web. 13 Sept. 2012. .

Nicholas Sheridan, Jr. said...

A bioregion is literally
a "life territory," a geographic area defmed by its unique
combination of natural features - including flora, fauna,
soils, landforms, climate and hydrology - and by the
types of human settlement

http://bst.sagepub.com/content/13/3/125

Casey Kivett said...

"Bioregionalism is an environmental movement and social philosophy that envisions decentralized community self-rule within political boundaries redrawn to reflect the natural contours of differing ecosystem types."

Taylor, Bron. "Bioregionalism: An Ethics of Loyalty to Place." Landscape Journal (2000): 50-72. Http://www.brontaylor.com/environmental_articles/pdf/Taylor--Bioregionalism+Ethics.pdf. Web. 12 Sept. 2012.

Trevor Gasdaska said...

Bioregionalism is "a body of thought concerned with contemporary society's disconnection from its natural base." (Davidson 313-332(20))

Davidson, Stewart. "The Troubled Marriage of Deep Ecology and Bioregionalism." Environmental Values. 16. (2007): 313-332(20). Web. 14 Sep. 2012.

Ivey Griffin said...

“Bioregionalism is the world at work on itself, getting something done which the world knows to be in need of doing. It gets work done through ideas, through words written and spoken, through organization, discipline, practice, and politics. But from first to last, it is the world’s work’ and the world either knows or will figure out how to get it done” (McGinnis xii).

McGinnis, Michael V. Bioregionalism. London: Routledge, 1999. Print.

Karina Gomez said...

"Bioregionalism is a rapidly growing green political philosophy emerging with greatest force from within the 'counterculture'" (Taylor 50). It focuses on a set of ideas on the natural world.

Taylor, Bron. "Bioregionalism: An Ethics of Loyalty to Place." Landscape Journal. 19 (2000):50-72. Web. 13 Sep. 2012. .

Josh Jordan said...

“an area constituting a natural ecological community with characteristic flora, fauna, and environmental conditions.”

"bioregion." The American Heritage® Science Dictionary. Houghton Mifflin Company. 14 Sep. 2012. .

Amanda Averett said...

Bioregionalism is the claim that "Interaction between the biophysical and human components of a region generates place-based environmental and social understanding and concern, which lead to locally shared power and responsibility in cooperative land management and governance" (Pfueller 173).



Pfueller, Sharron L. "Role of Bioregionalism in Bookmark Biosphere Reserve, Australia." Environmental Conservation 35.2 (2008): 173-186. Web. 13 Sept. 2012.

Megan Angel said...

"Bioregionalism is a philosophy and social movement grounded in the concept of ecologically sustainable human communities that exist in harmony with their natural surroundings."
(Kahn 125)
Cub, Kahn. "The Bioregional Paradigm: Applications to STS Education." Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society 13(1993): 125-127. Web. 14 Sept. 2012.

Michael Brangle said...

"Bioregionalism is a fancy name for living a rooted life. Sometimes called "living in place," bioregionalism means you are aware of the ecology, economy and culture of the place where you live, and are committed to making choices that enhance them." (Great)


Great River Earth Institution. "Bioregionalism." Living Awareness Institute. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Sept. 2012.

Will Macey said...

"Bioregionalism is a moral philosophy, sometimes romanticized as a "system of though," a framework for action that celebrates geographic and cultural diversity, the sacredness of the Earth, and the responsibilities of local communities to it."(Parsons 4)

Parsons, James J. "On "Bioregionalism" And "Watershed Consciousness"*." The Professional Geographer 37.1 (1985): 1-6. Web.

Molly Casey said...

"Bioregionalism is taking the time to learn the possibilities of place. It is a mindfulness of local environment, history, and community that leads to a sustainable future." (Flint)

Flint, Warren R. "Why a Bioregional Approach?" Sustainability Now. N.p., 1 Sept. 2010. Web. 13 Sept. 2012.

Kristin Snyder said...

“Bioregionalism is an environmental movement and social philosophy that envisions decentralized community self-rule within political boundaries redrawn to reflect the natural contours of differing ecosystem types” (Taylor 50).

Taylor, Bron. "Bioregionalism: an Ethics of Loyalty to Place." Landscape Journal 19.1-2 (2000): 50-72. Web. 13 Sept. 2012.

Tara Lucas said...

A bioregion is defined as "a region whose limits are naturally defined by topographic and biological features" (Merriam-Webster). It is a place where the characteristics of the surrounding environment are similar and are naturally occurring. Man does not have control over the features of this region and cannot be credited with creating it.

"bioregion." Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam-Webster, 2012. Web. 12 September 2012.

Seth Jones said...

Bioregionalism is an environmental field “concerned with reshaping our understanding of the human identity in relationship to place, to ecosystem and to nature” (Heffern).

Heffern, Rich. "Forest Expert Walks the Talk of Bioregionalism." National Catholic Reporter 27 Aug. 2004, column 23 ed.: N. pag. Points Of View Reference Center. Web. 12 Sept. 2012.

Kristen Church said...

"Bioregionalism is a call to become knowledgeable guardians of the places where we live" (Atlee)

Atlee, Tom. "Bioregionalism." The Co-Intelligence Institute. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Sept. 2012. .

John Cameron Murray said...

‘‘The aim of bioregionalism is to help our
human cultural, political and social structures
harmonize with natural systems.’’ (Wackernagel, 206)

Wackernagel, Mathis. "Rediscovering Place and Accounting Space: How to Re-embed the Human Economy." Ecological Economics (1999): 203-213. Web. 14 Sept. 2012.

derek silk said...

"Bio-regionalism refers to living a rooted,connected life - living with an awareness of the ecology, economy, and culture of the place you live"(Slow Movement N.P.).


"Bioregionalism - the Place of the Slow Movement." Slow Movement. N.p., 2012. Web.

Ashley Levan said...

Bioregionalism is "the politics of deep ecology, or deep ecology's social philosophy (Davidson 1)." Deep ecology deals with changing an individual's worldview.

Davison, Stewart. "The Troubled Marriage of Deep Ecology and Bioregionalism." Environmental Values 16.3 313-332. Web.

Nicholas Sheridan, Jr. said...

A bioregion is literally
a "life territory," a geographic area defmed by its unique
combination of natural features - including flora, fauna,
soils, landforms, climate and hydrology - and by the
types of human settlement

Kahn, Cub. "Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society." Bioregional Paradign. 13.3 (1993): 125. Web. 14 Sep. 2012. .

aagforster said...

"In general terms bioregionalism refers to living a rooted, connected life - living with an awareness of the ecology, economy and culture of the place where you live, and making decisions that support and enhance these features" (SlowMovement 1).

"Slow Movement." Living Slow in Our Bioregion. Slow Movement, n.d. Web. 14 Sept. 2012. .

SW said...

"Bioregionalism is a contemporary North American ecological movement committed to developing communities integrated with ecosystems... Bioregionalists did not offer a single prescription for restructuring everyday life; instead, they suggested some possible directions for social and environmental improvement. (Frenkel)"

Frenkel, Stephen. "Old Theories in New Places? Environmental Determinism and Bioregionalism." The Professional Geographer 46.3 (1994): 289-295. Web.